Zhang Jin Died of Persecution at 70; Son and Daughter-in-Law Still Persecuted in a Forced Labour Camp

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Mr. Zhang Jin, 70, was a Dafa practitioner from Taipusiqi, Inner Mongolia. He started practising Falun Gong in 1998 and was very diligent in his cultivation. After the persecution began on July 20th, 1999, police from the Public Security 610 Office1 put his home under surveillance, often placing a stake-out nearby and following him to his home to harass him. Zhang Jin died on March 13th, 2006, yet his son and daughter-in-law are still being persecuted in a forced labour camp.

His son, Zhang Junqing, and daughter-in-law, Duan Songping were forced to leave their excellent jobs and life in Kunshan City, Jiangsu Province in 2000 because of they practised Falun Gong. Since they could not return to their home afterwards, they finally went to Taipusiqi to live with their parents.

In November 2004, Duan Songping went job hunting in Ximeng City. She was reported to the police at the Ximeng Ethnic Professional Trade School when she explained the true situation of Falun Dafa to her former classmates. The police from Xilin Public Security in Hohhot City arrested and detained her. Duan Songping went on hunger strike for more than ten days to protest the persecution. Shen Ping, Xiong Jiji from the Kunshan City Public Security Political-Security department in Jiangsu Province, and the head of the Baochang County "610 Office" in Inner Mongolia also went to Xilin Public Security in Hohhot City to participate in the persecution. They sentenced Ms. Duan to three years of forced labour at the Inner Mongolia Women's Labour Camp.

In late December 2004, Zhang Jin's wife, his son Zhang Junqing, and another Dafa practitioner, Zhao Suqin, went to Inner Mongolia to visit Duan Songping. They were told by the police at the labour camp to wait to be received. Soon a dozen plainclothes police showed up and handcuffed all of them. In the freezing weather of -30oC (-22oF), they were stripped and searched three or four times, and then were all detained and beaten by the deputies. On January 3rd, 2005, they were transferred to the Xilin City Detention Centre by the Ximeng Public Security State Security Brigade, and were severely persecuted. On January 13th, 2005, Zhang Junqing was sentenced to three years of forced labour at Wuyuan County.

At that time Zhang Jin was suffering from a bone fracture caused by a traffic accident. He and his two-year-old grand daughter had no one to take care of them. His wife, son, and daughter-in-law were all arrested. He could not walk by himself, with his granddaughter crying for her mother. Yet even so, the Taipusiqi Public Security police officers Feng Guoliang, Cao Yi and other deputies often came to his home to harass and coerce him, trying to force him to sign and finger print a document. They even ordered him to report to the police at Ximeng Public Security whenever he was called to do so. Because of the constant stake-outs, surveillance, following, and phone tapping, he lost all of his freedom. Zhang Jin suffered unspeakable agony both mentally and physically.

On March 8th, 2006, his granddaughter contracted a high fever and kept crying for her mummy. Zhang Jin felt so desperate and sorrowful and he suddenly lost his breath and speech. He died on March 13th, 2006.

After his death, his family requested that his son and daughter-in-law come for his funeral, yet Wuyuan Forced Labour Camp did not release his son, but demanded that his family arrange automobile transportation and official papers for local government representatives. Inner Mongolia Women's Labour Camp also refused to release his daughter-in-law. The family's request for a death certificate was repeatedly delayed.

Baotou City Wuyuan Labour Camp
Wuyuan County Labour Camp PO Box #1, 015112
Phone: 86-478-5558241

Hohhot Women's Labour Camp:
Phone: 86-471-33922681


Note

1. "The 610 office" is an agency specifically created to persecute Falun Gong, with absolute power over each level of administration in the Party and all other political and judiciary systems.

Chinese version available at http://minghui.org/mh/articles/2006/3/21/123335.html

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